Dr Cletus Georges

Dr. Cletus Georges Considers Impact of Reduced Sleep Quality on Urologic Health

Urology specialist Dr. Cletus Georges explores the links between sleep disorders, erectile dysfunction, and testosterone deficiency in male patients.

From cardiovascular disease to obesity, poor sleep has long been associated with a variety of serious health complaints. Also understood to negatively impact urologic health, Dr. Cletus Georges, a leading urologist located in Orlando, Florida, considers the impact of a lack of sleep on conditions including erectile dysfunction and low testosterone.

“Ties between diagnosed sleep disorders and erectile dysfunction are well established,” explains Dr. Georges. As many as 80 percent of men, for example, he says, diagnosed with obstructive sleep apnea are believed to suffer from reduced erectile function.

More generally, insomnia is identified as a risk factor for sexual dysfunction in older men, according to Dr. Cletus Georges, something which he says is theorized to be linked to naturally decreasing testosterone levels. Other sleep disorders, including so-called restless leg syndrome, are also believed to be tied to an increased prevalence of erectile dysfunction. “The underlying relationship, however,” adds Dr. Georges, “remains largely unclear.”

With that said, where a patient is diagnosed with erectile dysfunction and also reports an inability to achieve adequate sleep, expert instruction on improving sleep quality is widely reported to have a beneficial effect on sexual function, according to the urologist. “Further to work patterns, smoking, and caffeine and medication use, controlled analysis is well documented as independently associated with poor erectile function,” reveals Dr. Cletus Georges.

Dr. Cletus Georges also briefly touches on the association between reduced sleep quality and testosterone deficiency. “Also responsible for decreased libido, lower testosterone levels are known to be a symptom of insomnia and other difficulties sleeping,” he explains. In fact, testosterone levels are known to drop with each hour of lost sleep, according to the expert.

While such a drop in testosterone levels may be largely negligible when sleep is lost in small amounts, an increased need to urinate at night as patients age can see the issue amplified significantly. “Nocturia, a condition in which a patient wakes up repeatedly during the night to urinate, can cause disturbed sleep serious enough to have a marked impact on testosterone levels,” says Dr. Cletus Georges.

More prevalent in older patients, this repeated sleep disturbance, he says, can, as a result, pose a serious threat to male patients’ urologic health.

“With poor sleep quality also a factor in diabetes, cardiovascular disease, and other serious conditions, as well as contributing toward poor urologic health, assessment of sleep should be considered extremely important,” adds Dr. Cletus Georges, wrapping up, “and should be deemed a vital aspect of care for patients experiencing urologic complaints such as erectile dysfunction and low testosterone levels.”

Dr. Cletus Georges - Risk Factors for Bladder Cancer

Dr. Cletus Georges Revisits Leading Risk Factors for Bladder Cancer

Urologist Dr. Cletus Georges provides a closer look at bladder cancer’s biggest risk factors.

 

Dr. Cletus Georges
Dr. Cletus Georges

Earlier this year, Dr. Cletus Georges explored the biggest bladder cancer risk factors among patients in the United States. A leading urologist based in Florida and a fellow of the American College of Surgeons, Dr. Georges once again revisits the subject, further highlighting key bladder cancer risk factors.

 

“Approximately 68,000 adults are affected by bladder cancer in the United States each year,” reveals Dr. Georges, a leading urology specialist based in Orlando, Florida.

 

With risk factors for the disease ranging from previous cancer treatments and smoking to a history of chronic bladder inflammation, it’s important that people also understand the symptoms of bladder cancer, according to Dr. Georges. “With risk factors also including age, gender, and chemical exposure, bladder cancer is now one of the most commonly diagnosed cancers in America,” he explains.

 

It’s, for this reason, that understanding both the risk factors and possible symptoms continues to be vital, according to the expert. “Bladder cancer is most prevalent in men,” says Dr. Georges, “and leading risk factors include smoking, plus a history of the disease, or a history of other, chronic bladder problems.”

 

Exposure to arsenic, exposure to the diabetes drug pioglitazone, and Lynch syndrome are all risk factors, too, he says. “Gender, however, remains the most significant risk factor,” adds specialist Dr. Georges, “and men are up to four times more likely to develop the disease than women.”

 

Age is another well-documented risk factor, and more than 70 percent of those diagnosed with bladder cancer are aged over 65. When diagnosed early, however, Dr. Georges reveals that the disease is largely considered to be highly treatable. “This is why recognizing possible symptoms is critical,” he explains, “from blood in the urine to painful urination or pain in the pelvic area.”

 

Seemingly innocent symptoms such as back pain and frequent urination may also be indicators of bladder cancer, which is why Dr. Georges suggests that anyone in any doubt make an appointment with a doctor. “If there’s any doubt, patients should seek advice from their primary care provider or a specialist urology doctor at their earliest convenience,” advises the Florida-based physician.

 

“It’s important to explore any possible signs or symptoms which may be causing concern or distress,” he adds, wrapping up, “in particular blood in the urine, especially where a patient is an older male, or subject to one or more other risk factors for bladder cancer.”

 

Dr. Cletus Georges attended Weill Cornell University Medical College in New York City, graduating in 1991 and completing his residency in urology at Chicago’s Northwestern University McGaw Medical Center in 1997. Shortly after, urology specialist Dr. Georges began his practice in Sebring, Florida, before relocating to the Orlando area where he remains settled today. Dr. Georges’ certifications and licensure include the American Board of Urology certification in urology and a Florida State Medical License. A doctor is also a fellow of the American College of Surgeons, a scientific and educational association founded in 1913 dedicated to improving the quality of care for patients by establishing unrivaled standards in surgical education and practice.

Dr. Cletus Georges Examines Growing Urology Devices Market

Urologist Dr. Cletus Georges takes an expert look at the impressive growth forecast within the urology devices market in coming years.

 

Dr. Cletus Georges
Dr. Cletus Georges

With the urology devices market set to enjoy a compound annual growth rate of more than 7 percent between now and 2023, Florida-based physician and urology specialist Dr. Cletus Georges provides a closer look at the figures, plus several of the reasons behind the significant anticipated growth.

 

“The urology devices market is expected to see a compound annual growth rate of 7.1 percent by 2023,” reveals Dr. Georges, a physician, and urology specialist for more than 30 years, today based in Orlando, Florida.

 

From endoscopy devices, dialysis equipment, and urinary stone and benign prostatic hyperplasia treatment equipment to minimally invasive surgery and robotic innovations, the forecast global growth is anticipated to be led by the United States, Japan, and Germany, according to Dr. Georges. “The urology devices market is growing rapidly, largely due to the increase of incidences of urinary tract system disorders and prostate cancer cases,” he reveals, “particularly in the United States.”

 

Ongoing development of urology devices designed to treat increasing numbers of patients with kidney diseases is understood to be another key driving force. “Market growth is further substantiated by growing awareness surrounding the availability of such devices,” Dr. Georges adds, “as well as benefits including vastly reduced treatment and recovery times.”

 

High costs, however, continue to impede growth in some markets. “Growing financial support for global research and development into urology devices is now beginning to offset this,” suggests Dr. Georges, “as is increasing per capita expenditure within healthcare tied to urological complaints and conditions.”

 

Major recent shifts toward less-invasive methods of treatment are further expected to play a part in accelerating growth within the urology devices market, according to the expert. “Less-invasive alternatives to traditional prostate cancer treatment, for example, will certainly foster growth within the market over the next three to five years,” Dr. Georges suggests.

 

The most significant growth is expected to occur in the Asia Pacific region, as well as in North America and across Europe. The North American region currently claims dominance over the international urology devices market according to the latest reports, largely supported by huge per capita urological healthcare expenses which are less common in other regional markets.

 

Europe, meanwhile, is understood to be leading research and development activities, according to Dr. Georges. “Beyond North America, Europe, and the Asia Pacific region, similarly impressive growth within the urology devices market across the rest of the world will likely follow in years to come,” he adds, wrapping up.

 

Dr. Cletus Georges attended Weill Cornell University Medical College in New York City, graduating in 1991 and completing his residency in urology at Chicago’s Northwestern University McGaw Medical Center in 1997. Shortly after, urology specialist Dr. Georges began his practice in Sebring, Florida, before relocating to the Orlando area where he remains settled today. Dr. Georges’ certifications and licensure include the American Board of Urology certification in urology and a Florida State Medical License. A doctor is also a fellow of the American College of Surgeons, a scientific and educational association founded in 1913 dedicated to improving the quality of care for patients by establishing unrivaled standards in surgical education and practice.

Dr. Cletus Georges - Successful Urology Career

Dr. Cletus Georges Offers a Look Back on Successful Urology Career

Florida physician and urology specialist Dr. Cletus Georges looks back on a decades-long career, starting with graduation from Michigan’s Andrews University more than 30 years ago.

 

Dr. Cletus Georges
Dr. Cletus Georges

From graduating with a bachelor’s degree in zoology with a biomedical option in 1987 to establishing himself as a prominent Florida urology specialist between Sebring and Orlando, Dr. Cletus Georges looks back on his decades-long medical career, including completing his urology residency at the famous Northwestern University McGaw Medical Center in Chicago in 1997.

 

“I first graduated from Andrews University in Berrien Springs, Michigan, with a bachelor’s degree in zoology,” reveals Dr. Georges, “with a biomedical option more than 30 years ago, back in 1987.”

 

Dr. Cletus Georges subsequently attended Weill Cornell University Medical College in New York City, graduating in 1991. “I then completed my residency in urology at Chicago’s Northwestern University McGaw Medical Center in 1997,” adds the specialist physician.

 

Shortly following the completion of his urology residency at the famous Chicago-based medical center, Dr. Georges established his practice in Sebring, Florida. “I later relocated to Orlando,” he adds, “where I remain settled today.”

 

Urologists such as Dr. Georges specialize in the male and female urinary tract, and male reproductive organs. So-called urologic organs include the adrenal glands, kidneys, bladder, urethra, testes, ureters, epididymis, and prostate. Urology patients may be suffering from bladder or prostate cancer, urinary tract infections, kidney stones, or other genitourinary disorders. Urologists may also have further, additional sub-disciplinary training.

 

Dr. Georges’ certifications and licensure include American Board of Urology certification in urology, and a Florida State Medical License, active through 2020.

 

As part of his work as a urology specialist, Dr. Georges has spoken openly and extensively about key prostate cancer risk factors, risk factors for bladder cancer, the diagnosis and treatment of kidney stones, stress urinary incontinence, and overactive bladder.

 

He has also provided insight into vasectomy procedures, erectile dysfunction, benign prostatic hyperplasia, and testosterone deficiency, among various other urologic conditions and complaints.

 

A doctor is also a fellow of the American College of Surgeons, a scientific and educational association founded in 1913 to improve the quality of care for surgical patients by setting high standards for education and practice.

 

“The American College of Surgeons is dedicated,” adds Dr. Georges, wrapping up, “to improving the care of surgical patients, and to safeguarding standards of care in an optimal and ethical practice environment.”

Dr. Cletus Georges - When to See a Specialist

Dr. Cletus Georges Explains Urologist Role and When to See a Specialist

Urologist Dr. Cletus Georges provides professional insight into the field and reveals when to see a urology specialist.

Cletus Roy Georges, MDA prominent Florida-based physician and urology specialist, Dr. Cletus Georges provides expert insight into the profession as he explains when it may be necessary to visit a urologist, including for conditions ranging from painful bladder syndrome and interstitial cystitis to kidney stones and prostate cancer.

Urologists primarily diagnose and treat conditions of the urinary tract. “In men, urologists may also treat conditions involving the reproductive tract,” explains Dr. Georges.

Working in a wide array of settings, from private clinics to hospitals and dedicated urology centers, urology specialists may also perform surgeries, such as to relieve a blockage, or to remove cancerous growths.

Further to the urinary and reproductive tracts, urologists also deal with the kidneys, bladder, and adrenal glands. “When dealing with the reproductive tract in male patients, a urology specialist may address conditions tied to the penis, testicles, and prostate alike,” adds Dr. Cletus Georges.

Areas of specialization within the field include urologic oncology, pediatric urology, neurourology, male infertility, and female urology, among others.

Urology education and training call for a four-year college degree, four years of medical school, and four or five years of resident medical training, according to Dr. Georges. “During their residency, new doctors work closely alongside experienced urologists to learn the necessary skills, such as in surgery, for example,” he adds.

A further two-year fellowship, in a specialty area, such as those outlined above, is optional. All urologists in the United States are certified by the American Board of Urology.

Urologists such as Dr. Georges routinely treat conditions including bladder, kidney, and other cancers, infertility, painful bladder syndrome, kidney stones, diseases of the kidneys, and serious urinary tract infections. In men, specifically, they also treat conditions of the prostate, and, in women, bladder prolapse and interstitial cystitis, according to the expert.

“So, when should a patient see a urologist?” asks Dr. Georges, rhetorically. “While a primary care physician can treat conditions such as mild urinary tract infections, a referral to a urologist will typically be made if symptoms fail to improve, or if a patient is experiencing, for example, blood in their urine, trouble urinating, weak flow, or leakage, reduced sex drive, and, in men, erectile dysfunction or a lump in the testicles,” he explains.

“Where cancer, such as prostate, bladder, or kidney cancer, is diagnosed, patients will often be referred to both a cancer specialist, known as an oncologist, and a urologist, focused specifically on conditions in this area,” Dr. Georges adds, wrapping up.

Dr. Cletus Georges attended Weill Cornell University Medical College in New York City, graduating in 1991 and completing his residency in urology at Chicago’s Northwestern University McGaw Medical Center in 1997. Shortly after that, urology specialist Dr. Georges began his practice in Sebring, Florida, before relocating to the Orlando area where he remains settled today.

Dr. Cletus Georges - Common Urinary Tract Infections

Dr. Cletus Georges Explores Common Urinary Tract Infections

Dr. Cletus Georges

Urologist Dr. Cletus Georges offers professional insight into a number of the most commonly diagnosed urinary tract infections.

Urinary tract infections sometimes referred to as bladder infections, are infections which occur in any part of the body’s urinary system, including the kidneys, the bladder, or the urethra. An experienced urologist with more than two decades of experience, Dr. Cletus Georges provides an expert look at some of the most commonly diagnosed urinary tract infections encountered by patients in the United States.

“UTIs, urinary tract infections or bladder infections are a common complaint among patients across the board,” reveals Dr. Georges, “although they are experienced more frequently by women than by men.”

Urinary tract infections says the doctor, typically occur in the bladder or urethra. “More serious infections, however,” he adds, “may also involve the kidneys.”

Symptoms of the urinary tract and bladder infections, such as cystitis and urethritis, include pain in the pelvis and pelvic region, a noticeable increase in the need or urge to urinate, and pain when urinating, plus any sign or sight of blood in any urine which is passed. “More serious kidney infections may present with back pain, ranging from moderate to severe, as well as feelings of nausea, vomiting, and signs of fever,” adds Dr. Georges.

Thankfully, prompt treatment with antibiotics is usually successful in the majority of cases of the urinary tract and bladder infection, according to the expert, and generally successful in treating infections tied to the kidneys. “With millions of patients in the United States suffering one or more instances of urinary tract infection each year, the majority of cases are easily treatable,” explains the urologist.

Usually considered to be what doctors call ‘self-diagnosable,’ in addition to pain in the pelvic region, an increase in the urge to urinate, pain when urinating, any sign of blood in any urine, and nausea, vomiting, or fever, several further common UTI symptoms exist. These include pain in the lower abdomen, groin, or bladder, including during urination or sexual intercourse, plus foul-smelling urine, dark or cloudy urine, bladder spasms, and any sense of unsuccessful or otherwise incomplete bladder emptying.

“Female patients may also experience vaginal irritation, cramping, and general malaise,” points out Dr. Georges.

Related conditions include painful bladder syndrome, overactive bladder, kidney stones, pelvic inflammatory disease, vaginitis, prostatitis, trichomoniasis, and benign prostatic hyperplasia.

“Any patient concerned about a possible urinary tract, bladder, or kidney infection should seek the advice or assistance of a urologist, OB-GYN, or their primary care provider at their first convenience,” Dr. Georges adds, wrapping up.

Dr. Cletus Georges attended Weill Cornell University Medical College in New York City, graduating in 1991 and completing his residency in urology at Chicago’s Northwestern University McGaw Medical Center in 1997. Shortly after that, urology specialist Dr. Georges began his practice in Sebring, Florida, before relocating to the Orlando area where he remains settled today.

Dr. Cletus Georges Shares Details of Risk Factors Tied to Prostate Cancer

Physician and urology specialist Dr. Cletus Georges explores key prostate cancer risk factors identified in the United States.

 

Dr. Cletus Georges
Dr. Cletus Georges

With the list of prostate cancer risk factors being potentially extensive and wide-reaching, particularly in older patients, it’s vital that all men fully understand and appreciate the facts and figures, according to Florida-based physician and urology specialist Dr. Cletus Georges. Here, Dr. Georges provides professional insight into the matter and shares advice and further information surrounding prostate cancer in America.

 

“From age and a family history of the disease to lesser-known risk factors tied to lifestyle, for example, it’s essential that men understand prostate cancer and its most common causes,” suggests Dr. Georges. All men, he says, are at some risk for prostate cancer, particularly upon reaching their late 40s and into their 50s and beyond.

 

Statistics show that, during their lifetime, approximately 13 out of every 100 men in the United States will be diagnosed at some point with cancer of the prostate. “Of those diagnosed, 20 percent currently lose their life to the disease,” reveals Dr. Georges.

 

“As such,” he continues, “it’s important that we all fully understand and appreciate what we currently know about the risk factors associated with prostate cancer.”

 

According to Dr. Georges, the two primary risk factors for prostate cancer are a family history of the disease—with a father or brother having been diagnosed with prostate cancer more than doubles a man’s risk—and advancing age. “These, of course, cannot be changed,” he explains, “yet further, still significant factors, such as cigarette smoking and poor diet, absolutely can.”

 

Quitting smoking, the doctor suggests, is advisable in any instance, and the key to helping prevent against all manner of common cancers, including cancer of the prostate. Other prostate cancer risk factors are understood to include chemical exposure, poor diet, obesity, a history of sexually transmitted infections, and past prostate issues, such as inflammation of the gland, which forms part of the male reproductive system.

 

“60 percent of prostate cancer cases occur in men aged over 65, and while rare in those under 40, it’s important even for younger men to understand the risks,” says Dr. Georges. “Chances of developing prostate cancer, for example, rise significantly in the late 40s and early 50s,” he adds.

 

“Furthermore, if a man has a family history of prostate cancer, as outlined above, it’s essential that he seeks regular cancer screening,” suggests the expert, “particularly as he gets older.”

 

“Regardless of risk factors, however,” Dr. Georges adds, wrapping up, “if a patient has any cause for concern surrounding prostate cancer, it’s vital that they seek the advice of a urologist or their primary care provider as soon as possible, as early diagnosis is often pivotal to beating the disease.”

 

Dr. Cletus Georges attended Weill Cornell University Medical College in New York City, graduating in 1991 and completing his residency in urology at Chicago’s Northwestern University McGaw Medical Center in 1997. Shortly after that, urology specialist Dr. Georges began his practice in Sebring, Florida, before relocating to the Orlando area where he remains settled today.

Dr. Cletus Georges - Overactive Bladder

Urologist Dr. Cletus Georges Addresses the Condition Known As Overactive Bladder

Cletus Roy Georges, MD offers a closer look at the uncontrollable and urgent need to urinate, commonly known as overactive bladder.

 

Dr. Cletus Georges
Dr. Cletus Georges

A common bladder problem among patients in the United States and globally, the condition is known as overactive bladder represents an urgent need to urinate which patients cannot control. An experienced urologist based in Florida, Dr. Cletus Georges explains more about the frequently occurring but often highly debilitating health complaint.

 

“Closely tied to another common condition known as stress urinary incontinence, overactive bladder is unique in that it is a condition tied solely to the bladder itself,” reveals Dr. Georges. Stress urinary incontinence, meanwhile, he goes on to explain, is anatomically distinct from overactive bladder, with the former, instead, affecting the urethra specifically.

 

Both conditions, however, are highly prevalent, particularly among the more elderly patients, according to the Urology Care Foundation, a 22,000-strong member organization committed to advancing urology research and education, headquartered in the community of Linthicum in Anne Arundel County, Maryland.

 

“Patients who suffer from both overactive bladder and with stress urinary incontinence,” explains Dr. Georges, “are said to suffer from what’s known as ‘mixed incontinence.'”

 

Male patients, he says, are more likely to suffer from overactive bladder than stress urinary incontinence. “Where stress urinary incontinence presents in male patients,” Dr. Georges explains, “it’s often due to damage or injury to the pelvic nerve or a side effect of prostate cancer surgery.”

 

“Overactive bladder, however,” he continues, “can present as a problem in anyone, and although it’s more prevalent in female patients and the elderly, it’s not necessarily tied to a secondary condition or surgery, as is often the case in other, similar conditions, particularly among male patients.”

 

Risk factors for overactive bladder include aging and diabetes—in all patients—plus an enlarged prostate in male patients, according to Dr. Georges.

 

“Affected patients typically experience the desperate need to urinate urgently, which may be difficult to control, and which may lead to the involuntary release of urine, something which can prove to be embarrassing, and may limit activities,” explains the expert.

 

Common ways to help address the problem, he says, include behavioral modification and pelvic floor muscle exercises. “These and further treatment options are widely demonstrated to reduce or eliminate symptoms in many patients,” Dr. Georges adds.

 

“Other treatment options for overactive bladder,” he notes, wrapping up, “currently include InterStim therapy, Botox, pharmacological intervention, and percutaneous tibial nerve stimulation.”

 

Cletus Roy Georges, MD attended Weill Cornell University Medical College in New York City, graduating in 1991 and completing his residency in urology at Chicago’s Northwestern University McGaw Medical Center in 1997. Shortly after that, urology specialist Dr. Cletus Georges began his practice in Sebring, Florida, before relocating to the Orlando area where he remains settled today.

Dr. Cletus Roy Georges shares professional insight into testosterone deficiency

Cletus Roy Georges, MD

Defined by symptoms including low libido and unexplained weight gain, urologist Cletus Georges, MD offers a closer, professional look at testosterone deficiency

Largely a symptom of the normal aging process, testosterone deficiency also has a number of other causes. From pituitary gland conditions and various medical disorders to having undergone chemotherapy and other forms of cancer treatment, urologist Cletus Roy Georges, MD reveals more about the issue, its symptoms, and its causes.

“Most notably in younger male patients, testosterone deficiency is quite often tied to conditions of the pituitary gland,” reveals Dr. Georges, “but can also be caused by kidney and liver disease, obesity, and diabetes, as well as AIDS and numerous genetic conditions.”

Testosterone deficiency, he says, can present with a variety of signs and symptoms, many of which are capable of drastically reducing the general health and wellness of affected patients. Also seen in those who have undergone chemotherapy and other primarily intensive forms of treatment for cancer, low testosterone or testosterone deficiency may also be the result of an infection or injury affecting the testicles.

“As far as the pituitary gland goes,” Dr. Georges adds, “located at the base of the brain, it controls all organs capable of producing hormones in the body, and thus, problems here, in particular, have the potential to cause a drastic drop in testosterone levels.”

Of symptoms witnessed by those experiencing testosterone deficiency, Dr. Cletus Georges Urology goes on to explain that the severity often depends on the length of time for which a patient has been suffering from reduced levels of the vital hormone. “Patients suffering from testosterone deficiency may find themselves feeling overly tired, sad, down, or depressed, experiencing low libido, mood irritability, and reduced exercise endurance,” he reveals, “and, also, otherwise unexplained, unwanted weight gain.”

More serious still, those experiencing reduced testosterone levels may encounter difficulty in gaining muscle mass, a loss of existing muscle, gynecomastia, a loss of body hair, a loss of facial hair, a low sperm count, and, indeed, infertility.

“Perhaps most serious of all among the effects of testosterone deficiency, however,” reveals Dr. Cletus Georges, “is a reduction in bone mineral density, and, with it, bone thinning.”

Dr. Cletus Roy Georges says that anyone experiencing any of the obvious, outward symptoms of testosterone deficiency should visit their physician or, preferably, a specialist, such as a urologist. “It’s advisable to have blood drawn, following which hormone levels may be precisely measured, and a diagnosis or conclusion promptly reached,” adds the expert, wrapping up.

Cletus Roy Georges, MD attended Weill Cornell University Medical College in New York City, graduating in 1991 and completing his residency in urology at Chicago’s Northwestern University McGaw Medical Center in 1997. Shortly after that, urology specialist Dr. Georges began his practice in Sebring, Florida, before relocating to the Orlando area where he remains settled today.

Dr. Cletus Roy Georges - Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia

Dr. Cletus Roy Georges Presents a Closer Look at Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia

Urologist Cletus Roy Georges, MD gives his professional insight into age-associated prostate gland enlargement.

 

Dr. Cletus Georges
Dr. Cletus Georges

A form of age-associated prostate gland enlargement, benign prostatic hyperplasia can cause urination difficulty, and, in other cases, incontinence or sexual dysfunction. An experienced urologist based in Kissimmee, Florida, and serving the local community and those from surrounding areas for many years, Dr. Cletus Roy Georges provides a closer, professional look at the common prostate condition.

 

“Symptoms of benign prostatic hyperplasia or so-called prostate enlargement, further to urination difficulties, may also include frequent urination, weak stream, or a loss of bladder control,” explains urologist Dr. Georges, “and, in some cases, sexual dysfunction.”

 

With more than 3 million U.S. cases diagnosed per year, benign prostatic hyperplasia requires a formal diagnosis and is usually treatable by medical professionals.

The condition is most commonly diagnosed in those aged over 40. “Laboratory tests or imaging are often required,” Dr. Georges explains, “and while benign prostatic hyperplasia is considered chronic, often lasting for years, or proving to be lifelong, the condition is generally treatable or can be managed by urologists such as myself, as well as the wider medical profession.”

 

Despite some misconceptions, benign prostatic hyperplasia isn’t believed by medical professionals to be a precursor to prostate cancer. Other secondary conditions may arise, however, further to the symptoms already outlined by Dr. Georges, and may include bladder stones and reduced kidney function, plus associated, often localized infections.

 

“Common treatments for benign prostatic hyperplasia include medications developed to relax the bladder, or to shrink the prostate, as well as what is typically a minimally invasive form of surgery,” reveals expert Dr. Georges.

 

Medications employed in the treatment of the condition currently include alpha-blockers, such as terazosin, and dihydrotestosterone blockers, such as finasteride. The exact cause of benign prostatic hyperplasia, according to Dr. Georges, is unclear, although risk factors are understood to include a family history of the condition, type 2 diabetes, obesity, and a lack of exercise.

 

“Existing prescribed medications such as pseudoephedrine, anticholinergics, and calcium channel blockers,” he adds, wrapping up, “may also worsen symptoms in those suffering from benign prostatic hyperplasia, which should also be taken into account.”

 

Cletus Roy Georges, MD attended Weill Cornell University Medical College in New York City, graduating in 1991 and completing his residency in urology at Chicago’s Northwestern University McGaw Medical Center in 1997. Shortly after that, urology specialist Dr. Georges began his practice in Sebring, Florida, before relocating to the Orlando area where he remains settled today.