Dr Cletus Georges
Dr. Cletus Georges

Urology specialist Dr. Cletus Roy Georges shares insight into vasectomy procedures

Cletus Roy Georges, MD offers professional insight into the male sterilization procedure known as a vasectomy.

A medical sterilization procedure for men who wish to permanently ensure against possible future pregnancies, a vasectomy is a surgery which involves cutting or blocking the two tubes known as the vas deferens. A urology specialist based in Orlando, Florida, Cletus Roy Georges, MD explains more about the procedure.

“A vasectomy is a relatively minor surgical procedure which renders a male patient permanently unable to make a female partner pregnant,” explains the urology specialist, “and involves cutting—or otherwise blocking—two tubes, known in medicine as the vas deferens so that sperm can no longer make its way into a man’s semen.”

Permanent and requiring surgery, modern vasectomy procedures are over 99% effective, according to Power to Decide, the campaign to prevent unplanned pregnancy. “The vasectomy operation itself takes around 30 minutes,” Dr. Georges explains. “A patient is given a local anesthetic before a urology specialist removes a small section of the vas deferens, usually before sealing the area with small clamps, one on either side,” he adds.

The punctures created, says Dr. Georges, are so tiny that stitches are not needed. “After the surgery, a patient should have someone available to drive them home safely,” adds the expert.

Pain, swelling, and bruising in the immediate area may follow, with any bruising typically having subsided within two weeks according to Dr. Georges. “Ensure plenty of rest in the hours or days which follow and most patients should be back to their normal activities within no time,” he continues, “although it is important to take things easy until everything is fully healed.”

Blood-thinning pain killers including aspirin and ketoprofen should be avoided in the week prior to undergoing the procedure. “Ibuprofen and naproxen can, however,” Dr. Georges explains, “be taken following the procedure, if necessary, but aspirin should be avoided for a further one week.”

“Most men,” he goes on, “can return to non-strenuous work within a couple of days, although if a patient is engaged in physical labor, for example, it’s vital that they talk with their urologist about when they can safely get back to work.”

Vasectomy, says Dr. Georges, is a permanent alternative to condoms and other predominantly female-focused birth control methods, including the birth control pill, intrauterine devices, diaphragms, and birth control shots, patches, and implants. “Furthermore,” he adds, wrapping up, “it’s among the safest, most effective forms of birth control currently available, hence its growing popularity among patients in the United States and globally.”

Cletus Roy Georges, MD graduated from Andrews University in Berrien Springs, Michigan with a bachelor’s degree in zoology with a biomedical option in 1987. Georges subsequently attended Weill Cornell University Medical College in New York City, graduating in 1991 and completing his residency in urology at Chicago’s Northwestern University McGaw Medical Center in 1997. Shortly after that, urology physician Dr. Georges started his practice in Sebring, Florida before relocating to Orlando, where he remains settled today.

Cletus Roy Georges - Kidney Stone Treatment

Cletus Roy Georges, MD Explains Diagnosis & Treatment of Kidney Stones

Dr. Cletus Georges, urology physician, explains more about the diagnosis and subsequent treatment of the painful condition known as kidney stones.

 

Cletus Roy Georges, MD.
Cletus Roy Georges, MD.

A small, hard deposit which forms in the kidneys, kidney stones affect more than 200,000 patients in the United States each year. Often incredibly painful to pass, kidney stones can be treated by a medical professional such as specialist physician Dr. Cletus Georges. Here, the experienced and highly-regarded urologist explains more about the diagnosis and treatment of the condition.

 

“Kidney stones are solid deposits of acid salts and other minerals which stick together and form in patients’ urine,” explains Cletus Roy Georges, MD, a urology specialist based in Orlando, Florida. The most common symptom of kidney stones, he says, is severe pain. “Usually presenting in the side of the abdomen, the pain can become so severe that patients find themselves physically nauseous,” adds the urology doctor.

 

While often excruciatingly painful, kidney stones do not typically cause any permanent damage. However, confirming cases of the condition usually calls for a formal medical diagnosis, with lab tests or imaging often required, according to Dr. Georges. “Treatment for kidney stones typically includes pain relievers,” he explains, “coupled with drinking adequate fresh water, in order to facilitate the prompt passing of the stone or stones in question.”

 

Dr. Georges Further Explains

Treatment is usually considered ‘short-term,’ resolving within a matter of days or weeks. “In severe cases, a medical procedure may be necessary to remove or break up large stones which a patient is unable to pass unaided,” adds the urologist.

 

Other symptoms are known to include pain in the back, blood in the urine, frequent urination, and excess sweating. “If you or a friend or family member suspects that they may be suffering from kidney stones, it’s important that you or they consult a doctor for more in-depth medical advice, and to rule out any other potential conditions,” adds Cletus Roy Georges, wrapping up.

 

Cletus Roy Georges, MD graduated from Andrews University in Berrien Springs, Michigan with a bachelor’s degree in zoology with a biomedical option in 1987. Georges subsequently attended Weill Cornell University Medical College in New York City, graduating in 1991 and completing his residency in urology at Chicago’s Northwestern University McGaw Medical Center in 1997. Shortly after that, urology physician, Cletus Roy Georges started his practice in Sebring, Florida before relocating to Orlando, where he remains settled today.

Dr. Cletus Georges

Dr. Cletus Georges offers a closer look at risk factors for bladder cancer

Urology specialist Dr. Cletus Georges uncovers common risk factors for bladder cancer and explains more about the condition and its symptoms.

With bladder cancer risk factors ranging from smoking and previous cancer treatments to a history of chronic bladder inflammation, as well as age, gender, and chemical exposure, with approximately 68,000 adults affected by the disease in the United States each year, understanding both the risk factors and symptoms is vital according to Cletus Roy Georges, MD.

“Bladder cancer is now one of the most commonly diagnosed cancers,” reveals Dr. Cletus Georges, a specialist physician focused on urology and based in Orlando, Florida, “most prevalent in men and with risk factors including smoking, a history of the disease, and past chronic bladder problems.”

Further risk factors, he says, extend to chemical exposure, exposure to arsenic, the diabetes drug pioglitazone, and Lynch syndrome, among others. “One of the most significant risk factors is gender,” adds Dr. Georges, “with men up to four times more likely to develop bladder cancer than women.”

Age-wise, more than 70% of individuals currently diagnosed with bladder cancer are aged 65 years or older, according to Dr. Georges. However, when diagnosed early, he points out, bladder cancer is considered highly treatable.

It’s for this reason, says Dr. Georges, that understanding both the risk factors and symptoms of the disease is vital. “Common bladder cancer symptoms or signs include blood in the urine, painful urination, and pain in the pelvic area,” explains the urology specialist. Other, less-specific symptoms which are also common signs of typically less serious conditions include back pain and frequent urination.

“If there’s any doubt, or a patient has any concerns surrounding bladder cancer and its risk factors or symptoms, they should seek advice from their regular primary care physician or a urology specialist at their earliest convenience,” advises Dr. Georges.

“Blood in the urine, in particular,” he adds, wrapping up, “warrants an appointment without delay, although it’s important to explore any signs or symptoms which are causing particular concern or distress.”

Cletus Roy Georges, MD graduated from Andrews University in Berrien Springs, Michigan with a bachelor’s degree in zoology with a biomedical option in 1987. Georges subsequently attended Weill Cornell University Medical College in New York City, graduating in 1991 and completing his residency in urology at Chicago’s Northwestern University McGaw Medical Center in 1997. Shortly after that, Dr. Georges started his practice in Sebring, Florida before relocating to Orlando, where he remains settled today.

Dr. Cletus Georges Explores Key Prostate Cancer Risk Factors

Dr. Cletus Georges Explores Key Prostate Cancer Risk Factors

Dr. Cletus Georges
Dr. Cletus Georges

From age to family history, it’s vital that prostate cancer risk factors are fully understood, particularly among men aged over 50. That’s according to Cletus Roy Georges, MD, a specialist physician focused on urology and based in Orlando, Florida as he shares a professional insight into key risk factors associated with cancer of the prostate.

“All men,” says Dr. Cletus Georges, “are at some risk for prostate cancer.”

In fact, for every 100 American men, approximately 13 will be diagnosed with prostate cancer during their lifetime, according to recent studies. “Of those dozen-or-so men, two or three are currently likely to lose their lives as a result of the disease,” adds Dr. Georges, “which is why it’s so important that we fully understand and appreciate the risk factors involved with prostate cancer.”

While age and a family history of prostate cancer are among the biggest risk factors and cannot be changed, other less-well-understood factors, such as diet and smoking, can, says Dr. Georges, be more easily addressed. “Quitting smoking, for example, is advised in any instance, but it’s especially important in helping to prevent against not just prostate cancer, but many other cancers, too,” he adds.

Currently, around six in ten cases of prostate cancer occur in men aged over 65. While the disease is rare in those under 40, chances of developing prostate cancer rise significantly after age 50, according to Dr. Georges.

Of family history, Dr. Georges explains that having a father or brother diagnosed with prostate cancer more than doubles a man’s risk of also developing the disease. “In such instances, it’s vital to seek regular prostate cancer screening,” he goes on to suggest.

Other factors, alongside diet and smoking, with less clearly defined effects on prostate cancer risk are believed to include obesity, chemical exposure, sexually transmitted infections, vasectomy, and inflammation of the prostate.

“If there’s any doubt, or a patient has any concerns surrounding prostate cancer and its risks, they should seek advice from their regular primary care physician or a urology specialist at their earliest convenience,” adds Dr. Georges, wrapping up.

Cletus Roy Georges, MD graduated from Andrews University in Berrien Springs, Michigan with a bachelor’s degree in zoology with a biomedical option in 1987. Georges subsequently attended Weill Cornell University Medical College in New York City, graduating in 1991 and completing his residency in urology at Chicago’s Northwestern University McGaw Medical Center in 1997. Shortly thereafter, Dr. Georges started his practice in Sebring, Florida before relocating to Orlando, where he remains settled today.